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How do I put a password on my linksys wireless router?
12-03-2012, 09:23 PM
Post: #1
How do I put a password on my linksys wireless router?
I want to know how to put a password on my router to block anyone around from using my internet connection. I'm not exactly computer savvy so a dumbed down answer would be appreciated.

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12-03-2012, 09:31 PM
Post: #2
 
Use your browser on a cable connection. Type in 192.168.1.1 (standard address) then log in. The password will be admin or blank (empty).
Set a password for admin in the admin section of the tool.
Change the channel well away from the default (11), and change the ssid. This prevents interference with local units.
In security set the key type and key. Use 128 bit WEP using 26 hexadecimal characters or WPA with a hard to guess passphrase (mixed numbers and letters). Write the code or passphrase down.
Save all your settings, then close the browser and disconnect the cable.
Use your machine's wireless utility to find your new ssid, set the encryption and connect.
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12-03-2012, 09:31 PM
Post: #3
 
That's actually not a password, but an encryption key that will be used to encrypt and decrypt all wireless transmissions. Here's how I'd do it on my Linksys WRT54G:

1. Log into the router from your browser with its IP address (usually 192.168.1.1)
2. Go to the Wireless tab on the first row of tabs.
3. Go to Wireless Security on the second row of tabs.
4. Select an Encryption type and set up a pass phrase for it. The longer, the better. WPA (if your network and all your computers can support 802.11G) is better than WEP. WEP is better than nothing. The router will produce at least one encryption key. All your wireless computers and devices will have to know this key.
5. When you're done, click Save Settings.

By the way, I strongly suggest these other security measures:

1.Deactivate wireless access to your router's administration web pages so only a computer connected via an Ethernet cable can reach them. This won’t affect wireless use of the Internet, just wireless administration of the router. Even if you don’t want to leave a computer connected via a cable, leave the cable there for when you need it.
2.Turn off the SSID (network name) broadcast from the router. There's no need to advertise your network's presence. You're not running a hotspot; everyone who should be on your network should know its name.
3.Change your SSID from the default. Hackers know that routers come with default SSIDs and look for them.
4.Limit access to only the computers you want on the network via MAC filtering. (MAC refers to unique NIC (Network Interface Card) addresses, not Macintosh computers, and not IP addresses.) This isn't a defense against hardcore freeloaders -- it's possible to fake MAC addresses -- but it keeps out casual interlopers.
5.Change the range of and/or limit the number of automatically assigned IP addresses (DHCP) to reduce the chance of extra users. Again, hackers know what ranges routers come from the factory with. Changing them makes it a little harder to hop on board.

Hope that helps.

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